YfmK is an N e -lysine acetyltransferase that directly acetylates the histone-like protein HBsu in Bacillus subtilis

Valerie J. Carabetta, Todd M. Greco, Ileana M. Cristea, David Dubnau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

N e -lysine acetylation is an abundant and dynamic regulatory posttranslational modification that remains poorly characterized in bacteria. In bacteria, hundreds of proteins are known to be acetylated, but the biological significance of the majority of these events remains unclear. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis acetylome and found that the essential histone-like protein HBsu contains seven previously unknown acetylation sites in vivo. Here, we investigate whether acetylation is a regulatory component of the function of HBsu in nucleoid compaction. Using mutations that mimic the acetylated and unacetylated forms of the protein, we show that the inability to acetylate key HBsu lysine residues results in a more compacted nucleoid. We further investigated the mechanism of HBsu acetylation. We screened deletions of the ∼50 putative GNAT domain-encoding genes in B. subtilis for their effects on DNA compaction, and identified five candidates that may encode acetyltransferases acting on HBsu. Genetic bypass experiments demonstrated that two of these, YfmK and YdgE, can acetylate Hbsu, and their potential sites of action on HBsu were identified. Additionally, purified YfmK was able to directly acetylate HBsu in vitro, suggesting that it is the second identified protein acetyltransferase in B. subtilis. We propose that at least one physiological function of the acetylation of HBsu at key lysine residues is to regulate nucleoid compaction, analogous to the role of histone acetylation in eukaryotes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3752-3757
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume116
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 26 2019

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Acetylation
Bacillus subtilis
Histones
Lysine
Proteins
Acetyltransferases
Bacteria
Post Translational Protein Processing
Eukaryota
Action Potentials
Lysine Acetyltransferases
Mutation
DNA
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Keywords

  • Acetylase
  • Acetylation
  • GNAT
  • Histone
  • Nucleoid compaction

Cite this

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title = "YfmK is an N e -lysine acetyltransferase that directly acetylates the histone-like protein HBsu in Bacillus subtilis",
abstract = "N e -lysine acetylation is an abundant and dynamic regulatory posttranslational modification that remains poorly characterized in bacteria. In bacteria, hundreds of proteins are known to be acetylated, but the biological significance of the majority of these events remains unclear. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis acetylome and found that the essential histone-like protein HBsu contains seven previously unknown acetylation sites in vivo. Here, we investigate whether acetylation is a regulatory component of the function of HBsu in nucleoid compaction. Using mutations that mimic the acetylated and unacetylated forms of the protein, we show that the inability to acetylate key HBsu lysine residues results in a more compacted nucleoid. We further investigated the mechanism of HBsu acetylation. We screened deletions of the ∼50 putative GNAT domain-encoding genes in B. subtilis for their effects on DNA compaction, and identified five candidates that may encode acetyltransferases acting on HBsu. Genetic bypass experiments demonstrated that two of these, YfmK and YdgE, can acetylate Hbsu, and their potential sites of action on HBsu were identified. Additionally, purified YfmK was able to directly acetylate HBsu in vitro, suggesting that it is the second identified protein acetyltransferase in B. subtilis. We propose that at least one physiological function of the acetylation of HBsu at key lysine residues is to regulate nucleoid compaction, analogous to the role of histone acetylation in eukaryotes.",
keywords = "Acetylase, Acetylation, GNAT, Histone, Nucleoid compaction",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - YfmK is an N e -lysine acetyltransferase that directly acetylates the histone-like protein HBsu in Bacillus subtilis

AU - Carabetta, Valerie J.

AU - Greco, Todd M.

AU - Cristea, Ileana M.

AU - Dubnau, David

PY - 2019/2/26

Y1 - 2019/2/26

N2 - N e -lysine acetylation is an abundant and dynamic regulatory posttranslational modification that remains poorly characterized in bacteria. In bacteria, hundreds of proteins are known to be acetylated, but the biological significance of the majority of these events remains unclear. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis acetylome and found that the essential histone-like protein HBsu contains seven previously unknown acetylation sites in vivo. Here, we investigate whether acetylation is a regulatory component of the function of HBsu in nucleoid compaction. Using mutations that mimic the acetylated and unacetylated forms of the protein, we show that the inability to acetylate key HBsu lysine residues results in a more compacted nucleoid. We further investigated the mechanism of HBsu acetylation. We screened deletions of the ∼50 putative GNAT domain-encoding genes in B. subtilis for their effects on DNA compaction, and identified five candidates that may encode acetyltransferases acting on HBsu. Genetic bypass experiments demonstrated that two of these, YfmK and YdgE, can acetylate Hbsu, and their potential sites of action on HBsu were identified. Additionally, purified YfmK was able to directly acetylate HBsu in vitro, suggesting that it is the second identified protein acetyltransferase in B. subtilis. We propose that at least one physiological function of the acetylation of HBsu at key lysine residues is to regulate nucleoid compaction, analogous to the role of histone acetylation in eukaryotes.

AB - N e -lysine acetylation is an abundant and dynamic regulatory posttranslational modification that remains poorly characterized in bacteria. In bacteria, hundreds of proteins are known to be acetylated, but the biological significance of the majority of these events remains unclear. Previously, we characterized the Bacillus subtilis acetylome and found that the essential histone-like protein HBsu contains seven previously unknown acetylation sites in vivo. Here, we investigate whether acetylation is a regulatory component of the function of HBsu in nucleoid compaction. Using mutations that mimic the acetylated and unacetylated forms of the protein, we show that the inability to acetylate key HBsu lysine residues results in a more compacted nucleoid. We further investigated the mechanism of HBsu acetylation. We screened deletions of the ∼50 putative GNAT domain-encoding genes in B. subtilis for their effects on DNA compaction, and identified five candidates that may encode acetyltransferases acting on HBsu. Genetic bypass experiments demonstrated that two of these, YfmK and YdgE, can acetylate Hbsu, and their potential sites of action on HBsu were identified. Additionally, purified YfmK was able to directly acetylate HBsu in vitro, suggesting that it is the second identified protein acetyltransferase in B. subtilis. We propose that at least one physiological function of the acetylation of HBsu at key lysine residues is to regulate nucleoid compaction, analogous to the role of histone acetylation in eukaryotes.

KW - Acetylase

KW - Acetylation

KW - GNAT

KW - Histone

KW - Nucleoid compaction

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