"You Don't Have to Claim Her": Reconstructing Black Femininity Through Critical Hip-Hop Literacy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article explores the ways in which females who identify with hip-hop often develop and construct their identities in relation to media representations of blackness and femininity in hip-hop music and culture. In order for educators to support female students in constructing identities of empowerment and agency, they should be willing and able to engage with hip-hop texts in the classroom. The use of critical hip-hop literacies can create spaces for discussions of power and identity that provide young people with culturally relevant tools for disrupting a system that maintains the silence and marginalization of young black girls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)529-538
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Keywords

  • 4-Adolescence
  • 5-College/university students
  • Action research
  • Case study
  • Critical analysis
  • Critical literacy
  • Discussion strategies
  • Feminist
  • Gender issues
  • New literacies
  • Popular culture
  • Qualitative
  • Self-perception
  • Specific media (hypertext, Internet, film, music, etc.)
  • Transformative
  • self-concept
  • sexual orientation
  • teacher research

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